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From Biomechanical Modeling to Biomechanical Simulation.


PB92164649

Publication Date 1990
Personal Author Ayoub, M. M.; Blair, E. L.
Page Count 32
Abstract The modeling and simulation of manual lifting were described and discussed. Several biomechanical models have been developed. The objective of biomechanical modeling has been to develop a model of the body or segment of the body which can accurately predict the kinematics and kinetics of task performance and hence the risk of injury. Biomechanical models can be divided into two dimensional and three dimensional models and can be either static or dynamic. These models require the input of data from electromyographic studies, muscle strength studies, and anthropometric measurements, as well as information on external forces applied to the body, displacement time, internal muscle force vectors, passive tissues, and other facts which will enable the researcher to achieve good results from the models. Very few human simulation models exist which predict the motion pattern a worker may or should follow in the performance of a task. These simulation models differ from biomechanical models in that biomechanical models require information about displacement time relationships as input, while simulation models have displacement time relationships as their output. According to the author, biomechanical and simulation models can be combined to provide the ultimate goal of developing a model which can estimate accurately the forces acting on the body and predict the motion patterns which will minimize such stress on the body.
Keywords
  • Ergonomics
  • Biomechanics
  • Occupational safety and health
  • Hoisting
  • Injuries
  • Musculoskeletal system
  • Kinetics
  • Kinematics
  • Angular displacement
  • Biomechanical models
Source Agency
  • Air Force
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
NTIS Subject Category
  • 95D - Human Factors Engineering
  • 57U - Public Health & Industrial Medicine
Corporate Authors Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Dept. of Industrial Engineering.; National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.
Supplemental Notes See also PB92-164516. Sponsored by National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.
Document Type Technical Report
NTIS Issue Number 199213
From Biomechanical Modeling to Biomechanical Simulation.
From Biomechanical Modeling to Biomechanical Simulation.
PB92164649

  • Ergonomics
  • Biomechanics
  • Occupational safety and health
  • Hoisting
  • Injuries
  • Musculoskeletal system
  • Kinetics
  • Kinematics
  • Angular displacement
  • Biomechanical models
  • Air Force
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  • 95D - Human Factors Engineering
  • 57U - Public Health & Industrial Medicine
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