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Muscle Overexertion During Repetitive Lifting.


PB2013106552

Publication Date 2005
Personal Author Marras, W. S.; Ferguson, S. A.; Burr, D. L.; Parakkat, J.; Chany, A. M.; Yang, G.
Page Count 157
Abstract The findings from each level of analysis, when considered collectively, provide profuse evidence of the complexity of spinal loading investigations and the factors that can greatly influence LBP risk. Throughout the analyses, there was a recurrent finding illustrating the difference in the development of motor control programs between workers with no experience and workers with years of experience. First brought to our attention was the fact that novices reported much higher levels of discomfort than their experienced counterparts, even though the spinal loading due to the continuous task was not as highly different between the two groups. The spinal loading resulting from the continuous task also indicated that there may be a certain lift frequency at which people are used to lifting.
Keywords
  • Occupational safety and health
  • Manual lifting
  • Muscles
  • Back injuries
  • Biomechanics
  • Exposure
  • Ergonomics
  • Materials handling
  • Musculoskeletal system disorders
  • Risk factors
  • Skeletal system disorders
Source Agency
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Corporate Authors Ohio State Univ., Columbus.; National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA.
Supplemental Notes Sponsored by National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA.
Document Type Technical Report
NTIS Issue Number 201315
Muscle Overexertion During Repetitive Lifting.
Muscle Overexertion During Repetitive Lifting.
PB2013106552

  • Occupational safety and health
  • Manual lifting
  • Muscles
  • Back injuries
  • Biomechanics
  • Exposure
  • Ergonomics
  • Materials handling
  • Musculoskeletal system disorders
  • Risk factors
  • Skeletal system disorders
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
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