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EMG-Based Methods for Testing Non-Keyboard Input Devices.


PB2005104000

Publication Date 2005
Page Count 34
Abstract Computer users who experience repetitive wrist movements and awkward hand positions are prone to developing upper extremity disorders. Manufacturers have designed various ergonomic mice in response to complaints of pain and discomfort related to computer mouse use. The objective of this work was to validate the use of surface electromyography (EMG) in assessing the design of non-keyboard input devices (computer mice). While holding the computer mouse EMG of the forearm and hand were recorded during a set of static tasks. The EMG signal provided information regarding the level of muscle activity and the varied combinations of muscular effort needed during computer mouse use. A significant decrease in the level of EMG activity was observed for the pronator muscles when subjects were tested using ergonomic computer mice. The EMG-based method was validated to be sensitive to the impact of subtle differences in shape/design of the computer mice on the amplitude of the surf ace EMG data. We also proved a significant effect of hand size on the level of muscle activity associated with different computer mice.
Keywords
  • Electromyography
  • Design
  • Ergonomics
  • Testing
  • Occupational safety and health
  • Muscle contraction
  • Computer mice
  • Non-keyboard input devices
Source Agency
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Corporate Authors National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
Document Type Technical Report
NTIS Issue Number 200512
EMG-Based Methods for Testing Non-Keyboard Input Devices.
EMG-Based Methods for Testing Non-Keyboard Input Devices.
PB2005104000

  • Electromyography
  • Design
  • Ergonomics
  • Testing
  • Occupational safety and health
  • Muscle contraction
  • Computer mice
  • Non-keyboard input devices
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
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